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Texas Counties Deliver

Elections Department

Rebecka K. LaCourse

Elections Administrator

 

Colorado County Courthouse Annex

318 Spring Street, Room 101
Columbus, Texas 78934
Phone:  (979) 732-6860
Fax:  (979) 732-2952

Email:  Elections

Colorado County Mission Statement:  To uphold a high level of professional election standards in order to earn and preserve public confidence in the electoral process.

 

   
  • The office of Elections Administrator was created by Commissioner’s Court in 2019 under the Texas Election Code Chapter 31, Subchapter B.

    The Elections Administrator is responsible for all federal, state, and county elections. In addition, cities, school districts, and political subdivisions contract with the office to conduct their election.

    The office is responsible for all voting equipment owned by Colorado County including testing, maintenance, storage, rental, and transport to voting locations.

    The Elections Administrator also serves as the County Voter Registrar, and supervises all voter registration for the county.

    The Elections Administrator also serves as the Early Voting Clerk, and serves to accept filings of Campaign Finance, Appointments of Campaign Treasurers, and other filings related to campaign finance.

     

    Plain Text/Spanish

  • Picture ID Required to Vote
    Absentee Voting
    State & Local Elected Offices
    Sobre la Oficina
    Frequently Asked Questions
    Nonpartisan, grassroots civic organization that encourages informed and active participation in government
    • Website Accessibility Statement

      General 

      Colorado County is committed to making the content of its web site accessible to all, including individuals with disabilities, and to ensuring its web site complies with Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act and Sections 504 and 508 of the Rehabilitation Act, by using World Wide Web Consortium’s (W3C) Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 Level AA. 

       

      Third-Party Sites

      Some of the pages on Colorado County web site may contain links to third-party sites.  Colorado County is not responsible for the online content or accessibility of third-party sites that do not relate to Colorado County programs, services and activities.  

      We Welcome Your Feedback

      If you have difficulty accessing information on our website because of a disability, please contact us. Be sure to include the information below, so that we may contact you to provide the information in another format.  

      Your name:

      Email address:

      Phone number:

      URL (web address) of the material you tried to access:

      The problem you are experiencing:

      Plain Text/Spanish 

    • Election security is a top priority for our office. We have worked to educate our elections workers through in person training and written materials on the numerous protections that are in place and are required by state law. 

       

      Through the use of state approved equipment and training we have developed strong security measures and procedures to secure the integrity of our elections. Below are some of the safeguards we include: 

      • No voting system is ever connected to the Internet at any point - either when votes are cast or when they are being counted.

      • Only software certified by the Texas Secretary of State can be loaded on a computer used for counting or accumulating vote totals.

      • Before and after use each day, all voting systems are sealed with locks and with seals with unique serial numbers, and all election workers must follow proper chain of custody procedures during the election, including a careful tracking of the serial numbers used to seal machines at the end of each period of voting.

      • When voting is occurring, election judges are required to periodically inspect the equipment to ensure there is no tampering or damage to the equipment.

      • The election worker at the polling place must confirm that there are zero votes cast at the opening of voting and at the end of voting they must compare the number of ballots cast to the number of voters that have checked-in. 

      • Poll watchers are allowed to observe at all early voting and election day polling locations and at the central count station where ballots are being counted or vote totals accumulated.

      • Background checks are required for all personnel that prepare, test or service all voting system equipment.

      • All voting systems are tested three times, twice before the machines are used in the election and once immediately after. The tests consist of a deck of ballots being voted on the machine and then tabulated to ensure that the machine results are correct and match the test stack of ballots. The machines cannot be used or deployed until the test is 100% successful. The first test of the voting machines  used in an election is open to the public, and notice of this test is published in the local paper.

      • A post-election audit (partial manual count) is required for all elections that have paper ballots.   Colorado County is STILL a paper ballot county.  Express Vote printing devices are considered a PAPER ballot.

      • The Secretary of State has the authority to conduct a manual or electronic recount of any election using electronic voting systems. 

      • All Election materials, including ballots, are stored within Colorado County.  The County Election Administrator is responsible for securing all election materials per the election code.  Nothing is sent or transported to "Austin" or another governmental agency.

      • All Election Officials are residents of Colorado County and are local individuals that meet the qualifications set forth by the Texas Election Code and take a Constitutional Oath of Office under penalties of perjury.

      • FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, SEE ELECTION CODE CHAPTER 129, SUB-CHAPTER C. 

      Plain Text/Spanish

      Ballot box.

  • Why Vote?

    The right of an American to vote is the right that defines our democracy. The health of that democracy is dependent on the energy and resolve with which it safeguards this most precious and fundamental of rights, and thus encourages the citizen participation that is its greatest strength.

    Elected officials decide many issues that affect our daily lives, such as:

    • How many police officers patrol the streets
    • How much money the school district will spend on teachers, classrooms, and text books
    • The types of materials a public library can loan out
    • Fees, laws, and regulation for environmental issues
    • Tax rates and how the government will spend tax dollars

    One vote does make a difference..

    • In 1800, Thomas Jefferson won the presidency with just one vote in the House of Representatives after a tie in the Electoral College.
    • In 1960, John F. Kennedy won the U.S. Presidency by the equivalent of less than one vote in each precinct.
    • In 1981, in a local school district election in Belmont, California, winner Chon Gutierrez and his opponent, Stanley Landland, received the same number of votes and had to draw straws to determine the election.
    • In 1984, Mary Herron lost the mayor's race in Coronado, California by nine votes. Her supporters thought she was the overwhelming favorite, and many did not bother to vote.
    •  
    • Plain Text/Spanish
    Election Judge
    A person appointed by the Commissioners Court (or by the county chair of a political party in a primary) for an upcoming election. This person in charge of the operation of a particular polling place on election day. He/she contacts the polling place and makes arrangements for opening/closing the polling place election day. Picking up supplies, gathering any additional clerks set by the Elections Coordinator and returning supplies to Central Count the night of the election.
     
     Alternate Judge
    A person appointed by the Commissioners Court (or by the county chair of a political party in a primary) for an upcoming election. This person is to assist the Election Judge in their duties. If for any reason the Election Judge is unable to perform their duties it's the responsibility of the Alternate Judge to step in and take over as Elections Judge. The Alternate Judge is to be affiliated with a different political party than that of the Election Judge.
     
     Clerk
    A clerk is appointed by the Election Judge of a polling place. The clerk is to assist the Judge and Alternate Judge in performing the assigned duties that they are given.
     
     Bilingual Election Clerk
    Is appointed by the Election Coordinator. The number of clerks needed depends on the polling place and the amount of Spanish sur-names in that particular precinct. The bilingual clerk is to assist any Spanish speaking voter that may need assistance during their voting process. The bilingual clerk may need to read the ballot to the voter or answer any questions the voter may have. The bilingual clerk is to assist the Judge and Alternate Judge into performing the assigned duties that they are given.

     Other Election Rolls
    Early Ballot Board
    Resolution Board
    Central Count Station
    Student Election Clerks

    Volunteer Deputy Registrar

    If you are interested in becoming a volunteer deputy registrar so you can register people to vote pleases contact our office and find out about training being offered.

     

    Training

    Due to State Recommendations and Health and Safety Concerns in-person training has been limited to small groups at this time.  On-line training is available.  Please call our office for details.

    Online Poll Worker Training

  •  Ways to Register

    To register to vote in Texas, simply complete a voter registration application and return it to your county election office at least 30 days before the upcoming election date.  To complete an application, you may:

    1. Complete an application using the link below. Simply fill in the required information, print, sign and mail directly to your county election office.
    2. Contact or visit your local Colorado County Election's Office to complete the voter registration process.
    3. Alternative Methods to Register:
      •  In-County Updates via Texas Online: If a voter has moved within the same county, the voter may update their address online at www.Texas.gov. Voters that are active or in suspense can update their name and/or residence address through this secure website. (See Link Above)
      • Printed Voter Registration Applications: If a voter has access to a printer, the voter can
        use the SOS Informal Online Application to complete a voter registration application. This
        application can be printed and mailed to the applicable county voter registrar. When the voter
        selects their county of residence, it will preprint the county voter registrar’s address on the
        form so that when the voter mails it, they send it directly to their county voter registrar.
      • Postage-Paid Voter Registration Applications: If a voter does not have access to a printer,
        the voter can request that a blank postage-paid voter registration application be mailed directly
        to the voter. The voter can fill out the request form on the SOS website. Counties can also
        mail blank applications to voters upon request.
      •  Revisions to Voter Registration Certificate: If a voter has their current voter registration
        certificate, they may make any necessary corrections or updates to the certificate, sign it and
        return it to the voter registrar.
      • Register2Vote.org: This is a third-party website that provides a remote printing option for voters. Voters can complete a form online and have a pre-filled application sent to them for completion. The voter must complete the form, sign it, and mail it in the included postage-paid envelope. This form is sent directly to the county voter registrar.

    You are eligible to register to vote if:

    • You are a United States citizen;
    • You are a resident of the county where you submit the application;
    • You are at least 17 years and 10 months old, and you are 18 years of age on
      Election Day.
    • You are not a convicted felon (you may be eligible to vote if you have completed your sentence, probation, and parole); and
    • You have not been declared by a court exercising probate jurisdiction to be either totally mentally incapacitated or partially mentally incapacitated without the right to vote.

    You Must Register By…

    Your application must be received in the Colorado County Election's Office or postmarked at least 30* days before an election for you to be eligible to vote in that election.

     

    Plain Text/Spanish

    Voter Registration Applications

    Colorado County Specific

    Return to:

    Election Administrator

    318 Spring St., Suite 101

    Columbus, TX 78934

    VoteTexas.gov
  • Looking Ahead...…..Uniform Election Dates

    Saturday, May 01, 2021

    Tuesday, November 02, 2021

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